The Town of Lincoln celebrates historical significance of Jordan Train Station with interpretive plaque unveiling

The Town of Lincoln celebrates historical significance of Jordan Train Station with interpretive plaque unveiling

 

Lincoln, ON – (June 7, 2022) – The Town of Lincoln, in collaboration with the Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee, has proudly acknowledged a historically significant building with an interpretive plaque at the former Jordan Train Station, located at 2818 Prince William Street in Jordan Station. The plaque was unveiled and a heritage ceremony was held on June 3, 2022, at the aforementioned location.

Properties recognized by a heritage interpretive plaque display Lincoln’s history, sharing stories of people, places, and events that have helped shape the community.  They enrich our sense of place and introduce newcomers and visitors to the unique character of regions, communities, and Nations across Ontario.

“Celebrating heritage in Lincoln inspires us to build the most vibrant, livable community possible,” said Town of Lincoln Mayor Sandra Easton.  “By recognizing heritage in our community, we remember the important components of our town and the rich history that contributes to the fabric of our community.”

“Heritage celebrations allow us to pause and reflect on the importance of history in our community,” said the Town’s Chief Administrative Officer, Michael Kirkopoulos. “We consider heritage an important part of our revitalization and strive to preserve our history so it is protected and enjoyed by our community members and visitors.”  

“I am proud of the continued support and advocacy of our community and leadership of the Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee for the continued commitment to heritage designation in the Town of Lincoln,” said Michael Seaman, Chair of the Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee.  “The recent unveiling celebrates community history and community pride by creating awareness about the importance of preserving our local heritage.”
 
The Jordan Train Station serviced Jordan Station and the surrounding area from 1913 until the last train stopped at the station on August 15, 1975. The Station, outhouse building, and signals were purchased from the Canadian National Railway and moved to this Jones Estate from its original location on Martha Street across the road on April 14, 1976. It is currently a private residence.

“Jordan Station” officially emerged as the new village name in 1875. Service in the busy rail period included five daily trains, freight, accommodation, light express, mail express, and night express. A second station was built after the original station burned down in 1873. The stone bridge across the Twenty Creek was also replaced with an all-steel double-tracked bridge in 1902.


For more information, please visit lincoln.ca/heritage.

About Jordan Train Station
This building serviced Jordan Station and the surrounding area from 1913 until the last train stopped at this station on August 15, 1975. The station, outhouse building, and signals were purchased from the Canadian National Railway (CNR) and moved to this Jones Estate (1890) from its original location on Martha Street south of the railroad tracks on April 14, 1976. It is currently a private residence.  The Great Western Railroad (GWR) purchased the right of way for the railway from Solomon Secord for 78 pounds in 1852. In 1853, construction of the railway and wooden bridge over the Twenty Creek was completed. The village of Bridgeport was registered on April 29, 1856, when Solomon Secord laid out village lots for a new development north and south of the tracks. The original train station was built c. 1856.
 
The railway stop became a busy hub for transporting grain and later fruit from local growers and canneries. The GWR built a second bridge across the Twenty Creek in 1866, using stone from the Gibson Quarry in Jordan on the escarpment above the 15-Mile creek. “Jordan Station” officially emerged as the new village name in 1875. Service in the busy rail period included five daily trains with freight, accommodation, light express, mail express, and night express. A second station was built after the original station burned down in 1873.
 
Over time, train ownership passed from the GWR to the Grand Trunk Railroad in 1882 and finally to the CNR in 1920. The stone bridge across the Twenty Creek was replaced with an all-steel double-tracked bridge in 1902. The stone piers can still be seen today, just south of the current tracks over the Twenty Creek. The expansion of roads (QEW 1934), cars and trucking up to the 1970s displaced the reliance on the railway for transporting local fruit and people. This remarkable Jordan Train Station stands as a reminder of a previous era and the significant role it once had in the local economy and everyday life.

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For media inquiries, please contact:

Liliana Busnello
Manager of Corporate Communications
Town of Lincoln
Direct: 905-563-2799 ext. 230
Tel: 905-563-8205

 

Jordan Train Station Interpretive Plaque

Jordan Train Station Interpretive Plaque

 

Jordan Train Station Interpretive Plaque Unveiling

(Left to Right)

Town Councillor Mike Mikolic, Michael Seaman (Chair of the Heritage Committee), Gary Dandridge (Heritage Committee member), Dana Jones (owner’s son), Town Councillor Lynn Timmers, Mayor Sandra Easton, Town Councillor Tony Brunet. Barb Mitges (Heritage Committee member). 

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